Health Equity and Racial Justice (2022)

Projects & Initiatives

PI works with a breadth of partners and communities to develop strategies and practices to keep people healthy and safe in the first place.Below is a selection of ongoing or recent projects.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (1)

    Beyond COVID-19 Recovery: Advancing a System of Prevention for Racial Justice and Health Equity

    Community members and racial justice advocates are collectively pursuing transformative solutions designed for equity and justice, which requiresdismantling and replacingpolicies,practices, andinvestment patterns that reinforce structural racism.Prevention Instituteisjoiningthis callto actionthrough a body of work to advance aSystem of Prevention for Racial Justice and Health Equity that supports health, safety, and wellbeing.

  • The Big Cities Health Coalition (BCHC) and Prevention Institute, with support from the Skoll Foundation,are developing a playbook for rebuilding a public health system, rooted in racial equity, that builds on COVID-19 lessons and experiences.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (2)

    COVID-19 Public Health and Equity Collaborative

    This collaborative is developing a COVID-19 policy agenda that takes the need for stable housing, mental health and wellbeing, food security, and equitable enforcement of emergency and public health powers into account.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (3)

    Park Equity

    Park equity—fair and just access to parks, trails, community gardens, and other green spaces—is essential to healthy communities. But park inequities unjustly affect low-income communities across the U.S., especially people living in predominantly Black and Latino neighborhoods. Through our local-level projects and national initiatives, we are building momentum for park equity.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (4)

    (Video) Advancing Health Equity: A Racial Justice Approach to Public Health

    Countering the Production of Health Inequities through Systems and Sectors

    The opportunity to be healthy is not afforded to everyone in America. As a result, many preventable illnesses occur in higher frequency, earlier, and with greater severity among people living in concentrated poverty and in communities of color. With support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Prevention Institute analyzed what has contributed to these inequities to determine a pathway forward to produce health equity.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (5)

    Water Equity

    Our approach to water equity connects a range of environmental and social issues whose challenges and solutions are interwoven, from drinking water quality and stormwater management to urban greening and fiscal equity. It also recognizes the full spectrum of disparate environmental conditions that negatively impact the health of low-income communities of color—including air, soil and water pollution and disparities in natural and recreational amenities—and considers how system-level solutions may address or compound inequities.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (6)

    Convergence Partnership

    Prevention Institute serves as strategic advisor for theConvergence Partnership,providing staffing and guidance on strategy development and policy analysis. The Convergence Partnership is a national funder collaborative working to transform policies, practices, and systems to advance racial justice and health equity.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (7)

    Healthy, Equitable, Active Land Use Network

    HEALU was formed in response to structural barriers to equity in Los Angeles’ land use arena, and in an effort to strategically and collaboratively promote systems change. HEALU augments the role of health in the land use sphere through training, capacity building, convening and proactively advancing key strategies to ensure a healthier, more equitable land use system.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (8)

    Healthy and Equitable Land Use Demonstration Projects

    Decisions about land use—like what projects get built and where, whose voices shape the process, and what supports are in place to ensure that existing residents benefit from new investments—directly impact community health. Through our local-level projects and policy work, we are building a model of how to embed health equity in all land use related decisions.

See all

(Video) Building Narrative Power for Health Equity and Racial Justice

Publications & Other Resources

We research and write reports, white papers, fact sheets, opinion pieces, and journal articles, as well as produce videos and podcasts. Here are some of our latest offerings.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (9)

    Building Bridges: The Strategic Imperative for Advancing Health Equity and Racial Justice

    This concept paper explores how and why to bring together people working on health equity and racial justice, including understanding the tensions between these two approaches, recognizing shared goals, and identifying five strategic opportunities for collaboration.

    ContactLa'Quana Williamsfor more information.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (10)

    Partnering for health equity: Grassroots organizations on collaborating with public health agencies

    Drawing on interviews with grassroots leaders from across the country, this report explores how the political landscape, funding, staff skills, leadership, and partnerships influence the ability of community-based organizations to work effectively with public health agencies to address health inequities and racial injustices.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (11)

    A Time of Opportunity: Water, Health, and Equity in the Los Angeles Region

    The Los Angeles region is reimagining its water infrastructure to meet the needs of a growing population in the face of increasingly unreliable water supplies and a changing climate.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (12)

    BRIEF: Countering the Production of Health Inequities: Ensuring the Opportunity for Health for All

    (Video) Building a Culture of Health Equity Monthly Lecture Series - Operationalizing Racial Justice

    In this brief, Countering the Production of Health Inequities: Ensuring the Opportunity for Health for All,Prevention Institute analyzes how various sectors such as housing, education, and economic development have contributed to inequities in health but also have important roles to play in achieving health equity. There is a role for every institution, sector, and system working together to achieve an equitable culture of health across the United States.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (13)

    Moving from Understanding to Action on Health Equity: Social Determinants of Health Frameworks and THRIVE

    This document outlines the development of THRIVE (Tool for Health and Resilience in Vulnerable Environments) and the concept of the social determinants of health (SDOH). By analyzing 22 SDOH frameworks in addition to THRIVE, we identify similarities and differences among the frameworks and highlight THRIVE’s unique contribution to the field.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (14)

    Measuring What Works to Achieve Health Equity: Metrics for the Determinants of Health

    This paper provides a framework for understanding how disparities in health outcomes are produced and how health equity can be achieved, particularly by addressing the determinants of health. It also delineates a set of metrics that could reflect progress toward achieving health equity.

See all

Tools & Services

We have developed a broad range of practical, free-to-use tools to guide practitioners, advocates, and policymakers in planning and implementing prevention strategies. We also provide services to help you use our tools to create healthy and safe communities.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (15)

    THRIVE is a tool for assessing the status of community conditions and prioritizing them for action to improve health, safety, and health equity.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (16)

    Health Equity and Prevention Primer

    Our free, interactive online primer helps practitioners build primary prevention and equity into community health.

    (Video) Health Equity Webinar Series (Microlearning Module): Operationalizing Racial Justice
  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (17)

    A Practitioner's Guide for Advancing Health Equity

    This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guide, developed with help from Prevention Institute, helps public health practitioners advance health equity through community prevention strategies.

See all

Profiles in Action

These profiles, written by PI and our partners, show what community prevention looks like on the ground, all across the country.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (18)

    THRIVE Empowers Youth to Improve Community Safety: A California Case Example

    The staff of Public Health Institute brought THRIVE to Planada, California to engage youth to address pedestrian safety. After using Photovoice to assess community conditions related to pedestrian safety, the group decided to focus on promoting safe routes to school. To advance safe routes to school, the youth engaged in a multi-faceted campaign, including efforts to create policy change.

  • Health Equity and Racial Justice (19)

    THRIVE Advances a Shared Understanding of Social Determinants of Health: A Louisiana Case Example

    After the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI) participated in a THRIVE training-of-trainers, LPHI staff applied the concepts of THRIVE to spark organizational change. They created a health equity workgroup and expanded the focus of their ongoing initiatives and coalition to include community environments. They trained community activists on THRIVE and saw quick outcomes with the development a community garden.

See all

(Video) Racial justice and health equity in the healthcare system with Dr. Washington Hill

FAQs

How does health equity relate to social justice? ›

Health equity means social justice with respect to health and reflects the ethical and human rights concerns articulated previously. Health equity means striving to equalize opportunities to be healthy.

What is the main goal of health equity? ›

Health equity means increasing opportunities for everyone to live the healthiest life possible, no matter who we are, where we live, or how much money we make.

What are the barriers to health equity? ›

Contributors to health equity are boundless and extend into social, political, economic, and cultural domains. Access to health care facilities may be hindered by geographical distance, lack of transportation, employment requirements, or confinement due to incarceration, refugee status, or political factors.

Why is health equity important in society? ›

Equity and efficiency can go hand in hand in healthcare delivery. Offering equitable health care leads to more efficient healthcare systems overall, as a healthier population requires less medical care. That means fewer doctor's visits, less healthcare spending per patient, and better health outcomes.

What is social justice theory in healthcare? ›

Social justice in the health system refers to providing equal healthcare services for all individuals, regardless of their personal characteristics [6]. The AACN defines social justice as fair treatment, regardless of one's economic status, race, ethnicity, age, citizenship, disability, or sexual orientation [7].

What are the basic principles of health equity? ›

Health equity is an authentic expression of an organization's commitment to the ideals of social justice, respect, access, and dignity. Health equity initiatives must be action-oriented and embedded in the authenticity of an organization. It requires culture change in most organizations.

How can we promote health equity? ›

Communities can promote health equity by adopting policies, programs, and practices that: Support equitable access to quality and affordable health and other social services (e.g., education, housing, transportation, child care) and accessibility within these services.

What is an example of health inequity? ›

Health inequity causes preventable deaths. There are many examples of this, but one of the clearest examples is the difference between infant health and mortality among Black and white babies born in the U.S. Black people are more likely than white people to have babies with a low birth weight.

How can racial disparities be reduced in healthcare? ›

Ensuring Access to Care for All. Providing access to comprehensive preventive screenings and treatment can play a role in reducing and eliminating at least some racial inequities in health.

Why do minorities have less access to healthcare? ›

Compared with white persons, black persons and other minorities have lower levels of access to medical care in the United States due to their higher rates of unemployment and under-representation in good-paying jobs that include health insurance as part of the benefit package (Blendon et al., 1989; Trevino et al., 1991 ...

What is the difference between health equality and health equity? ›

Health equity prioritizes social justice in healthcare. Unlike health equality, which calls for equal treatment for all patients, health equity prioritizes treatment and care based on need. Equality does not always work in practice because some people need more support — or a different kind of support — than others.

Why is it important to promote health equity? ›

By making health equity a shared vision and value, increasing community capacity to shape outcomes, and fostering multi-sector collaboration, these solutions foster equal opportunity for health, which is the foundation for a vibrant, healthy community.

Why is it important to address health equity? ›

Addressing these inequities could help to mitigate the disparate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and prevent further widening of health disparities going forward. Moreover, narrowing health disparities is key to improving our nation's overall health and reducing unnecessary health care costs.

How does health equity impact quality? ›

Health equity allows people to reach their full health potential and receive high-quality care that is fair and appropriate to them and their needs, no matter where they live, what they have or who they are. A high-quality health system recognizes and respects social, cultural and linguistic differences.

Is health equity a human right? ›

Health is a fundamental human right. Health equity is achieved when everyone can attain their full potential for health and well-being. Health and health equity are determined by the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, play and age, as well as biological determinants.

How can health care lead to social injustice? ›

Disparities in healthcare among poor Americans are amplified by substandard care, poor housing and deteriorated environments. Poorer Americans are more likely to be impacted by accidents, violence, drug overdoses, suicide and smoking as well.

Are health inequities unjust? ›

Health inequities are differences in health status or in the distribution of health resources between different population groups, arising from the social conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age. Health inequities are unfair and could be reduced by the right mix of government policies.

Why is social justice An important concept in society as a whole and in healthcare? ›

Why Is Social Justice Important? Social justice promotes fairness and equity across many aspects of society. For example, it promotes equal economic, educational and workplace opportunities. It's also important to the safety and security of individuals and communities.

What do you think is the nurse's role in promoting social justice and health equity? ›

ADVOCATING FOR POLICY CHANGE

Public policies have a major influence on health care providers, systems, and the populations they serve. Accordingly, nurses can help promote health equity by bringing a health lens to bear on public policies and decision making at the community, state, and federal levels.

What is equity in health care? ›

Health equity is achieved when every person has the opportunity to “attain his or her full health potential” and no one is “disadvantaged from achieving this potential because of social position or other socially determined circumstances.” Health inequities are reflected in differences in length of life; quality of ...

What is a health equity issue? ›

Health equity exists when individuals have equal opportunities to be healthy. The ability to be healthy is often associated with factors such as social position, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual identity, or disability. When these factors limit a person's ability to be healthy it can lead to health inequity.

What can we do about health disparities? ›

Raising public and provider awareness of racial/ethnic disparities in care; Expanding health insurance coverage; Improving the capacity and number of providers in underserved communities; and. Increasing the knowledge base on causes and interventions to reduce disparities.

What are the social determinants of health? ›

Social determinants of health are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age. They include factors like socioeconomic status, education, neighborhood and physical environment, employment, and social support networks, as well as access to health care (Figure 1).

What can be done to improve equality and equity in health? ›

Top 10 Ways To Improve Health and Health Equity
  • Stop the spread of COVID-19.
  • Invest in public health infrastructure.
  • Address the opioid and substance use epidemic.
  • Mitigate climate change and invest in environmental justice.
  • Reduce poverty and improve economic stability.
  • Improve education access and quality.
28 Apr 2022

What is one action you can take to create health equity? ›

To address health inequities, communities must remove obstacles to good health such as poverty, discrimination, and their consequences, including: powerlessness and lack of access to well-paying jobs, quality education and housing, safe environments, and health care (Braveman et al., 2017).

How does race and ethnicity affect health? ›

The data show that racial and ethnic minority groups, throughout the United States, experience higher rates of illness and death across a wide range of health conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, asthma, and heart disease, when compared to their White counterparts.

What are the three 3 sources of health inequality? ›

3The Root Causes of Health Inequity. Health inequity, categories and examples of which were discussed in the previous chapter, arises from social, economic, environmental, and structural disparities that contribute to intergroup differences in health outcomes both within and between societies.

What is the root cause of health inequity? ›

Health inequity arises from root causes that could be organized in two clusters: The unequal allocation of power and resources—including goods, services, and societal attention—which manifests itself in unequal social, economic, and environmental conditions, also called the determinants of health.

What are racial disparities in healthcare? ›

The Institute of Medicine defines disparities as “racial or ethnic differences in the quality of health care that are not due to access-related factors or clinical needs, preferences, and appropriateness of intervention.” Racial and ethnic minorities tend to receive poorer quality care compared with nonminorities, even ...

How can racial equity be improved in healthcare? ›

Expand the use of community-based providers, such as community health workers, promotoras, and peer navigators. Require graduate medical education to include training on structural racism and implicit bias and how to combat both through antiracist medical practice.

What are the 5 health disparities? ›

Examples of Health Disparities
  • Mortality.
  • Life expectancy.
  • Burden of disease.
  • Mental health.
  • Uninsured/underinsured.
  • Lack of access to care.

What are some ways to reduce racial disparities? ›

  1. Revise policies and laws with disparate racial impact.
  2. Address implicit racial bias among criminal justice professionals.
  3. Reallocate resources to create a fair playing field.
  4. Revise policies that exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities and redirect public spending toward crime prevention and drug treatment.
3 Feb 2015

What race has the most health disparities? ›

African Americans have the highest mortality rate for all cancers combined compared with any other racial and ethnic group. There are 11 infant deaths per 1,000 live births among Black Americans.

How does discrimination affect health care? ›

Previous research on older adults of color found that perceived discrimination was associated with an increased risk of avoiding or delaying care, in part because doctors may communicate messages that discourage appropriate use of health services.

What is the most significant health barrier for minorities? ›

Health barriers for minorities are most significant because of: poor water quality. poverty. lack of sanitation.

What is the difference between justice and equity? ›

What defines equality, equity and justice? Equality: applying the same provisions to all, with the assumption that this will benefit all equally. Equity: tailored support is provided in order to make the ground equal. Justice: addressing inequity at the root, so that barriers are removed for all.

Why is equity more important than equality? ›

Equality means each individual or group of people is given the same resources or opportunities. Equity recognizes that each person has different circumstances and allocates the exact resources and opportunities needed to reach an equal outcome.

How do you talk about health equity? ›

Our Teams Are Here to Help
  1. HSA. 866.346.5800. 866.346.5800. 24/7/365 support.
  2. FSA, HRA and Commuter Benefits. 877.924.3967. 877.924.3967. 24/7/365 support.
  3. COBRA and Direct Bill. 877.722.2667. 877.722.2667. Mon-Fri: 7am-7pm CT.
  4. Not yet a member? 866.735.8195. 866.735.8195. 24/7/365 support.

Why is social justice a major issue in the context of health and healthcare? ›

Social justice principles work together to manage health inequities based on morbidity and mortality rates and cultural, social, economic and political factors. For example, social justice principles are able to contribute to addressing health inequities for those living in rural and isolated areas.

How is social justice fundamental to the practice of nursing? ›

In practising social justice, as an example, for a person living with diabetes or other diseases for that matter, the nurse is mandated to not only provide hands-on or bedside nursing care, but also initiate and advocate for health policies and social systems that eradicate the causes of diabetes or other diseases.

What does social justice require for the public's health? ›

Justice demands that government take actions to safeguard the public's health, but that it do so with respect for individuals and sensitivity to the needs of the underprivileged. In the realm of public health and civil liberties, then, both sides claim the mantle of justice.

How does inequality and social justice impact health consequences for populations? ›

There are close correlations between social inequality and mortality, infant overmortality, lower life expectancy, higher occurrence of mental illness, obesity, homicide, violence, use of illicit drugs, number of people in prisons, lack of trust in other people, teenage pregnancy and less social mobility, among others.

Is health equity a human right? ›

Health is a fundamental human right. Health equity is achieved when everyone can attain their full potential for health and well-being. Health and health equity are determined by the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, play and age, as well as biological determinants.

What do you think is the nurse's role in promoting social justice and health equity? ›

ADVOCATING FOR POLICY CHANGE

Public policies have a major influence on health care providers, systems, and the populations they serve. Accordingly, nurses can help promote health equity by bringing a health lens to bear on public policies and decision making at the community, state, and federal levels.

Are health inequities unjust? ›

Health inequities are differences in health status or in the distribution of health resources between different population groups, arising from the social conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age. Health inequities are unfair and could be reduced by the right mix of government policies.

What is an example of justice in nursing? ›

Examples of justice in practice include offering the same treatment options to two patients, even where one may have a condition through no fault of their own and the other through personal behaviour (e.g. lung cancer and smoking), and allocating resources equally among members of the population.

What is healthcare ethics justice? ›

The principle of justice in medical ethics refers to a fair and equitable distribution of health resources. One part of seeking justice is promoting the fiscal sustainability of the health system for the greater good of society, which is where value comes into play.

How the principle of justice applies to the nursing profession? ›

Justice. Justice in nursing ethics implies that patients have a right to fair and impartial treatment. This means no matter what a patient's insurance status or financial resources may be, or what gender identification, age or ethnicity they are, they have the right to fairness in nursing decisions.

Why is social justice important in the planning and implementation of healthcare programs? ›

Social justice in health care translates to the delivery of high-quality care to all individuals. Achieving social justice is critical in health care to ensure that all individuals can maintain their highest level of health and wellness.

Why doctors should care about social justice? ›

To be most effective, doctors should be formally trained in social justice and advocacy skills to uproot and address the health inequities and the root causes of a broken health care system. Traditional medical school curriculum should include social justice training and advocacy skills.

What elements factors impact the idea of social justice? ›

The five main principles of social justice include access to resources, equity, participation, diversity, and human rights.

How can racial disparities be reduced in healthcare? ›

Ensuring Access to Care for All. Providing access to comprehensive preventive screenings and treatment can play a role in reducing and eliminating at least some racial inequities in health.

What is an example of health inequity? ›

Health inequity causes preventable deaths. There are many examples of this, but one of the clearest examples is the difference between infant health and mortality among Black and white babies born in the U.S. Black people are more likely than white people to have babies with a low birth weight.

How does social inequality affect healthcare? ›

Poor health and poverty do go hand-in-hand. But high levels of inequality, the epidemiological research shows, negatively affect the health of even the affluent, mainly because, researchers contend, inequality reduces social cohesion, a dynamic that leads to more stress, fear, and insecurity for everyone.

Videos

1. DAY OF ACTION: Keynote: Health Equity & the Queer Racial Justice Movement
(International Festival of Arts & Ideas)
2. Health Equity and COVID-19: Catalyst for Racial Justice in Health and Health Care
(American Hospital Association)
3. What is the California Health Equity & Racial Justice Fund? | Race and Culture
(ABC10)
4. Health Integration, Innovation and Racial Justice: A Call to Action
(MeharryTube)
5. Dr. Radhakrishna awarded the Health Equity & Racial Justice Awarded
(CA Public Health)
6. Building Bridges for Health Equity and Racial Justice
(Prevention Institute)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Rob Wisoky

Last Updated: 11/16/2022

Views: 6158

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 87% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Rob Wisoky

Birthday: 1994-09-30

Address: 5789 Michel Vista, West Domenic, OR 80464-9452

Phone: +97313824072371

Job: Education Orchestrator

Hobby: Lockpicking, Crocheting, Baton twirling, Video gaming, Jogging, Whittling, Model building

Introduction: My name is Rob Wisoky, I am a smiling, helpful, encouraging, zealous, energetic, faithful, fantastic person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.