9th Grade English | Taming of the Shrew | Free Lesson Plans (2023)

Table of Contents
Unit Summary Texts and Materials Core Materials Supporting Materials Assessment Key Knowledge Essential Questions Thematic Skill Themes Vocabulary Lesson Map Common Core Standards Core Standards Language Standards Language Standards Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Supporting Standards Language Standards Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Informational Text Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Reading Standards for Literature Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Speaking and Listening Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Writing Standards Pre-AP English Standards Core Standards Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Supporting Standards Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

Unit Summary

In Unit 5, through their reading of William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and supplemental texts, students will examine the thematic idea of desirability and its relationship to the messages directed at us from the plethora of phobias and ideologies circulating in contemporary society. Throughout this unit, students will examine the relationship between characters and setting in a text and analyze how characters and scenes convey the values, attitudes, and traditions of a place in fiction; unpack how nonfiction writers unfold a series of complex ideas and synthesize their ideas to form a more nuanced understanding of a topic; and analyze how an author’s use of figurative language helps them to interpret poetry.

This unit starts with a close reading of Marge Piercy's"Barbie Doll" and provides students the opportunity to begin to unpack the idea of desirabilitywhile also examining how a poet uses structure and other poetic techniques to convey meaning in a text. In the remainder of the first arc of the unit, students read a variety of supplemental texts to explore the various perspectives around what is considered desirable. Texts include excerpts from The Bluest Eye, "My body is a cage of my own making" by Roxanne Gay, and "I Want a Wife" by Judy Brady. At the end of Arc one, students will engage in a Socratic Seminar and write an insight piece, putting various authors and texts into conversation with each other and reaching a new conclusion.

The second arc of the unit propels students into the language of Shakespeare using a select few sonnets and soliloquies,including an excerpt from King Lear, act 1, scene 1 and"My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130)".In this phase, students will examine how Shakespeare uses diction and syntax, specifically how he inverts sentences and uses wordplay to create meaning in his plays and poems.

The third arc of the unit is a study of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, a comedy written around 1590 and first published in 1898. The central conflict of the comedy revolves around Petruchio’s taming of Katherine in order to make her a desirable wife and allow suitors to court and marry her more desirable sister, Bianca. Students will analyze how Shakespeare uses fast-paced and witty dialogue to portray complex characters, their values, and their relationships. Additionally, students will consider how the comedic effect that Shakespeare produces helps to create social commentary on desirability.

In the fourth and final arc of the unit, students will engage in a summative unit seminar on The Taming of the Shrew and prepare for the unit performance task in which they will research and analyze a time in history where there was an effort to tame a group of people who were considered less desirable in order to appease normative societal values or ideas using techniques that Shakespeare used in his comedy.

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9th Grade English | Taming of the Shrew | Free Lesson Plans (1)

Unit Syllabus

Build student independence and support their planning and self management by sharing the Unit Syllabus, which outlines the objectives and assignments for each lesson, as well as the assessments for the unit.

Texts and Materials

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Core Materials

Supporting Materials

Text Selection Rationale

Purchase Books

Assessment

This assessment accompanies Unit 5 and should begiven on the suggested assessment day or after completing theunit.

  • Download Free Response Question

  • Download Socratic Seminar

  • Download Performance Task

Key Knowledge

Essential Questions

The central thematic questions addressed in the unit or across units

Thematic

  • Who or what decides who is romantically or socially desirable? How do we know a person is desirable or that we find them attractive?
  • What messages have phobias and ideologies directed at us about worth and belonging in our relationships? What happens when we challenge the status quo around desirability?
  • How might societal standards of desirability impact our self-worth and relationship with our bodies and others?

Skill

  • How does Shakespeare leverage comedy to make a societal commentary?
  • In what ways does Taming of the Shrew advocate for changes in social or political attitudes?

Themes

In order to successfully teach this unit, you must be intellectually prepared at the highest level, which means reading and analyzing all unit texts before launching the unit and understanding the major themes the authors communicate through their texts. By the time your students finish reading this text, they should be able to articulate and explain the major themes the authors communicate through their texts related to the following thematic topics as they uncover them organically through reading, writing, and discourse. While there is no one correct thematic statement for each major topic discussed in the unit texts, there are accurate (evidence-based) and inaccurate (non-evidence-based) interpretations of what the authors are arguing. Below are some exemplar thematic statements.

  • Desirability:
    • Standards of desirability are a social construct. When some people fail to meet those standards, like The Bluest Eye's Pecola Breedlove, it leads to self contempt while others like Katherine from The Taming of the Shrew actively fight against those standards until succumbing to them in order to get what she wants. Ultimately, standards of desirability are tragic and detrimental to those who are not yet considered desirable as it leads to negative feelings of self and impacts their sense of belonging.
  • Nonconformity and Power:
    • When people meet standards of desirability and other societal expectations, they gain power and status that allows them to fluidly move through the world; however, in failing to conform to societal expectations, people lose power, become oppressed, and are often marginalized. While having a strong relationship with self and a sense of self-worth can counteract powerlessness, society is ultimately responsible for changing its structures of power in order to support those who do not meet societal expectations and are powerless.

Vocabulary

Literary terms, text-based vocabulary, idioms and word parts to be taught with the text

Text-based

commendablecredulousentreatfloutintolerablepedantpeevishrenownedsobriety strifewoowrangling

Literary Term

comedy and humordictionhyperbolemonologuepunsatiresonnetsoliloquytonewit

To see all the vocabulary for Unit 5, view our 9th Grade Vocabulary Glossary.

Lesson Map

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Common Core Standards

L.9-10.5

Language Standards

L.9-10.5— Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.5

Language Standards

L.9-10.5— Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

RI.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RI.9-10.6

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.6— Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

RL.9-10.1

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.1— Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.2— Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.9-10.3

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.3— Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RL.9-10.3

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.3— Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RL.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RL.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

RL.9-10.5

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.5— Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

SL.9-10.1

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1— Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1— Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.a

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.a— Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.a

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.a— Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.b

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.b— Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.b

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.b— Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.c

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.c— Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.c

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.c— Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.d

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.d— Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

SL.9-10.1.d

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.d— Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

SL.9-10.2

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.2— Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

W.9-10.2

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2— Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2— Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.3

Writing Standards

W.9-10.3— Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.9-10.4

Writing Standards

W.9-10.4— Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.9-10.8

Writing Standards

W.9-10.8— Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.9

Writing Standards

W.9-10.9— Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Supporting Standards

Standards that are practiced daily but are not priority standards of the unit

L.9-10.1.b

Language Standards

L.9-10.1.b— Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

RI.9-10.1

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.1— Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.2— Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Informational Text

RI.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

RL.9-10.1

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.1— Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.9-10.2

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.2— Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.9-10.3

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.3— Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

RL.9-10.4

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.9-10.4— Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

SL.9-10.1

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1— Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.9-10.1.a

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.a— Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

SL.9-10.1.b

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.b— Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

SL.9-10.1.c

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.c— Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

SL.9-10.1.d

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.9-10.1.d— Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

W.9-10.1

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1— Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.9-10.1

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1— Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.9-10.1.a

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1.a— Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.9-10.1.b

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1.b— Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.

W.9-10.1.c

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1.c— Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.9-10.1.d

Writing Standards

W.9-10.1.d— Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.9-10.2

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2— Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.9-10.2.f

Writing Standards

W.9-10.2.f— Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.9-10.5

Writing Standards

W.9-10.5— Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.9-10.5

Writing Standards

W.9-10.5— Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

W.9-10.6

Writing Standards

W.9-10.6— Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

W.9-10.10

Writing Standards

W.9-10.10— Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Pre-AP English Standards

Core Standards

The content standards covered in this unit

LO 1.2A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.2A— Analyze the development of an argument, evaluating its central claim(s), the soundness of the reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

LO 1.2B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.2B— Explain how the rhetorical features of an argument contribute to its effect and meaning.

LO 1.2B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.2B— Explain how the rhetorical features of an argument contribute to its effect and meaning.

LO 1.3A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.3A— Analyze how literary elements interact to develop the central ideas of a work of literature.

LO 1.3B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.3B— Analyze how thewriter's use of stylistic elements contributes to a work of literature's effects and meaning.

LO 1.4A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.4A— Explain the relationship between a text and its historical or cultural context.

LO 1.4B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.4B— Synthesize ideas from multiple texts and explain howthe texts may convey different perspectives on a common theme or idea.

LO 2.2A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.2A— Assert a precise central claim.

LO 2.2B

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.2B— Develop a line of sound reasoning and choose an organizing structure to convey that reasoning to the reader.

LO 2.2C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.2C— Support a claim by selecting and incorporating evidence that is relevant, sufficient, and convincing.

LO 2.2E

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.2E— Use carefully selected language, syntax, and stylistic and persuasive elements to strengthen an argument.

LO 2.3A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3A— Assert a precise central claim that establishes the relationship between a work's features and overall meaning.

LO 2.3A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3A— Assert a precise central claim that establishes the relationship between a work's features and overall meaning.

LO 2.3B

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3B— Organize ideas and evidence to effectively develop and support a thesis.

LO 2.3C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3C— Select and incorporate relevant and compelling evidence to support a thesis.

LO 2.3C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3C— Select and incorporate relevant and compelling evidence to support a thesis.

LO 2.3D

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3D— Use an appropriate style and carefully selected language to strengthen an analysis.

LO 2.3D

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3D— Use an appropriate style and carefully selected language to strengthen an analysis.

LO 2.4A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.4A— Establish a narrative point of view.

LO 2.4B

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.4B— Use a variety of techniques to advance plot, theme, and the evolution of character(s).

LO 2.4C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.4C— Use carefully selected language to help the reader imagine or share the experience conveyed in the narrative.

LO 3.1A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.1A— Use context clues to infer the meaning of multiple-meaning or unfamiliar words.

LO 3.1A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.1A— Use context clues to infer the meaning of multiple-meaning or unfamiliar words.

LO 3.2B

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.2B— Compose or revise language to ensure that word choice and language patterns are consistent with the intended style, voice, register, and tone of a text or presentation.

LO 3.2B

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.2B— Compose or revise language to ensure that word choice and language patterns are consistent with the intended style, voice, register, and tone of a text or presentation.

LO 3.3A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.3A— Compose or revise language to ensure sentences are grammatically correct and that their internal structures provide clarity.

LO 3.3A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.3A— Compose or revise language to ensure sentences are grammatically correct and that their internal structures provide clarity.

LO 4.1A

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1A— Identify a problem, idea, or central question and complete preliminary readings to determine the purpose, scope, and process of the research.

LO 4.1A

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1A— Identify a problem, idea, or central question and complete preliminary readings to determine the purpose, scope, and process of the research.

LO 4.1B

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1B— Gather, evaluate, and synthesize evidence from multiple authoritative sources (e.g., print, digital, multimedia) to address the research question or problem.

LO 4.1B

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1B— Gather, evaluate, and synthesize evidence from multiple authoritative sources (e.g., print, digital, multimedia) to address the research question or problem.

LO 4.1C

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1C— Determine the credibility, reliability, and relevancy of selected sources.

LO 4.1C

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.1C— Determine the credibility, reliability, and relevancy of selected sources.

LO 4.2A

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2A— Make an independent claim that addresses the research question or problem and is supported by the findings.

LO 4.2A

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2A— Make an independent claim that addresses the research question or problem and is supported by the findings.

LO 4.2B

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2B— Communicate findings and their significance, incorporating written, spoken, and multimedia approaches according to task, purpose, and audience.

LO 4.2B

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2B— Communicate findings and their significance, incorporating written, spoken, and multimedia approaches according to task, purpose, and audience.

LO 4.2C

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2C— Summarize, paraphrase, or directly quote others' words appropriately and effectively.

LO 4.2C

Big Idea 4: Investigating Through Research

LO 4.2C— Summarize, paraphrase, or directly quote others' words appropriately and effectively.

LO 5.1A

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1A— Extend the conversation around an idea, topic, or textby formulating questions and recognizing the claims and perspectives of others.

LO 5.1A

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1A— Extend the conversation around an idea, topic, or textby formulating questions and recognizing the claims and perspectives of others.

LO 5.1B

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1B— Cite relevant evidence and evaluate the evidence presented by others.

LO 5.1B

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1B— Cite relevant evidence and evaluate the evidence presented by others.

Supporting Standards

Standards that are practiced daily but are not priority standards of the unit

LO 1.1A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.1A— Analyze a wide range of texts for multiple meanings.

LO 1.1C

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.1C— Use a repertoire of active reading strategies appropriate to the text and task

LO 1.2A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.2A— Analyze the development of an argument, evaluating its central claim(s), the soundness of the reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

LO 1.2A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.2A— Analyze the development of an argument, evaluating its central claim(s), the soundness of the reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

LO 1.3A

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.3A— Analyze how literary elements interact to develop the central ideas of a work of literature.

LO 1.4B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO 1.4B— Synthesize ideas from multiple texts and explain howthe texts may convey different perspectives on a common theme or idea.

LO 2.1A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.1A— Establish a purpose for the composition and make deliberate choices about genre, organization, and language according to the purpose and intended audience

LO 2.1B

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.1B— Gather and generate a variety of ideas, and select the most appropriate based on the purpose of the composition.

LO 2.1C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.1C— Compose, revise, edit, and eventually share written work to ensure communication is clear and the intended rhetorical purpose and effect are achieved.

LO 2.1D

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.1D— Reflect on the writing process and how it shapes one’s ongoing development as a writer.

LO 2.2A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.2A— Assert a precise central claim.

LO 2.3A

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3A— Assert a precise central claim that establishes the relationship between a work's features and overall meaning.

LO 2.3B

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3B— Organize ideas and evidence to effectively develop and support a thesis.

LO 2.3C

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3C— Select and incorporate relevant and compelling evidence to support a thesis.

LO 2.3D

Big Idea 2: Constructing Texts

LO 2.3D— Use an appropriate style and carefully selected language to strengthen an analysis.

LO 3.1A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.1A— Use context clues to infer the meaning of multiple-meaning or unfamiliar words.

LO 3.2B

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.2B— Compose or revise language to ensure that word choice and language patterns are consistent with the intended style, voice, register, and tone of a text or presentation.

LO 3.3A

Big Idea 3: Focusing on Language

LO 3.3A— Compose or revise language to ensure sentences are grammatically correct and that their internal structures provide clarity.

LO 5.1A

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1A— Extend the conversation around an idea, topic, or textby formulating questions and recognizing the claims and perspectives of others.

LO 5.1B

Big idea 5: Entering the Conversation

LO 5.1B— Cite relevant evidence and evaluate the evidence presented by others.

LO.1.1B

Big Idea 1: Engaging with Texts

LO.1.1B— Understand how structural, stylistic, visual, and graphic elements of a text (e.g., photographs, charts, graphs, illustrations, headings, fonts) contribute to its meaning.

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